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‘New’ path of totality map shows more parts of Texas will get to see the solar eclipse

In World
April 01, 2024

Despite modern technology, the sun’s radius is difficult to measure. New data shows that the sun is a tad bigger than previously thought.

These new calculations have slightly shifted the solar eclipse’s path of totality — just a week before the event.

People are also reading: Texas weather odds don’t look good for solar eclipse as early forecasts show chance of rain

Expert John Irwin has recently published a new map with updated lines for the April 8 solar eclipse, Forbes reports.

The red line shows the original path of totality, while the orange line represents the path updated with the new data.

A red arrow indicates a loss in the path of totality, and a green arrow shows a gain.

Here’s what you need to know:

More: Still not sure where to see the solar eclipse in Texas? Here’s a list of parks, watch parties

Updated total solar eclipse path of totality

Path of totality extends to McKinney Falls State Park in Austin

Though Austin-Bergstrom International Airport still remains outside the path of totality, McKinney Falls State Park is now included.

More of Austin's southeast region is now in the path of totality, including McKinney Falls State Park.

More of Austin’s southeast region is now in the path of totality, including McKinney Falls State Park.

San Antonio’s metro area to see more total darkness

The path of totality has widened to include slightly more of San Antonio’s metropolitan area.

The path of totality has widened slightly in San Antonio.

The path of totality has widened slightly in San Antonio.

Denton loses part of the path of totality

Residents of Denton were originally advised to travel southeast to the southern half of Lewisville Lake, but now they might need to go farther to be within the path of totality.

Denton has lost a portion of the path of totality, but the eclipse will remain visible farther southwest.

Denton has lost a portion of the path of totality, but the eclipse will remain visible farther southwest.

Solar eclipse map: Path of totality in Texas

The map below is based on data from NASA, NOAA and the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies to show eclipse times, peak sun coverage and likely levels of cloudiness during the solar eclipse April 8.

This article originally appeared on Austin American-Statesman: Solar Eclipse 2024: New data changes path of totality map in Texas

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